Featured Book

Featured Articles

Travel Safety

Featured Advertisers

Hotel Savoy Prague

Sea Kayak Advenures

Search

go

Search By Country:


Search Now:

Experiences

go

My Beautiful Vancouver


Copyright Tourism Vancouver - used with permission.Vancouver, British Columbia, was voted best city to visit by the Society of American Travel Agents, and best Canadian city to live in by Canadians. But Vancouver is more than just a cosmopolitan, sophisticated city with the freshest West Coast cuisine and a sparkling day and nighttime personality. It has a pretty…no not just pretty… but stunning face. Surrounded by deep green waters, back-dropped by iced jagged mountains -- the area is a knockout… I would even say… When you see it… You'll give it a 10.

 

Vancouver (like any world class beauty queen) is an accessible, diverse city to be enjoyed at leisure and from a suitable stage. Canada Place with its teflon-coated sails that seem to float across the Burrard Inlet is just one such 'stage': built as the Canada Pavilion for Expo 86, this exotic architectural curiosity, that brings to mind Sydney’s Opera House, functions as Vancouver's cruise-ship dock and convention center. It is also at the very essence of Vancouver.

So stroll with me along the outside promenade. Stop for a minute and face east; you'll see Vancouver's modern skyline of glass and chrome and in it a mirror image of mountains, sky and water -- Vancouver's green and rain soaked backyard, all available for skiing, hiking, boating and beaching, depending on the season.

Copyright Tourism Vancouver - used with permission.Hidden from your view, but only steps away is historic Gastown. Named after notorious saloon owner "Gassy Jack" Deighton, one of Vancouver’s colourful pioneers, Gastown has an unusual working steam clock circa 1898, warehouse facades, cobblestone roads, cutting-edge late-night clubs, Steam Works brew pub, restaurants, and is a popular place to watch film crews or even find fame as an extra. (In fact it is difficult to drive through downtown Vancouver and not see a film crew in action.)

TimeOut in Gas Town:

Stop for a brewtique beer and some local fresh oysters from the oyster bar at the very popular Steam Works brew pub. If you’re in the mood for an elegant dinner call first for a seat at Rain Tree at the Landing; where Bill Clinton and entourage had dinner during his APEC 1998 visit. Clinton’s other choice? The trendiest, yuppiest bar and restaurant in yuppy Yaletown -- the Century Grill. See Guy Goes Gourmet for a Review & Recipe.

Bill & Monica stuff or the gift Bill denied:

Rumor has it Bill Clinton bought a gift for Monica Lewinsky at a store (Hill's Indian Crafts, 165 Water St.) located in Gastown -- the token of his affection? A CDN$30 faux marble bear's head. Items available for purchase at Hill's Indian Crafts range from $30 to $1525.

Still standing on the Canada Place promenade, face west; you'll be struck by a panoramic view of one of Vancouver's three visible mountain ranges, the Coast Mountains. Look closer and notice twin-peaks towering 1,600 meters above the deep blue Burrard Inlet, most often above low-slung clouds. Vancouverites call these twin peaks 'The Chief's Daughters' or 'The Lions.' A legend tells of a First Nation's Chief whose daughters kept watch over the peace and brotherhood of the Pacific Coast. 'The Lions' moniker dates back to 1890, when the peaks were renamed in a response to a judge's opinion that they resembled the 'couchant lions' of British heraldry.

Now still facing the ocean look out over the deep water harbor. You will marvel at the traffic -- rust colored freighters plying their trade from Asia and beyond; local sea buses bustling with commuters; helicopters whirring overhead; float planes skidding to a halt at the Floatplane Terminal; and elegant white cruise ships resting in-between their Alaska itineraries from late spring to fall. Vancouver is the busiest port on North America's West Coast.

This three block long outdoor promenade where we are standing, is a favorite of residents and tourists (and leads to the famous Sea Walk). Two of Vancouver's most elegant hotels, the Pan Pacific and the Canadian Pacific owned Waterfront Hotel are located here, as is the World Trade Centre, Convention Center, shopping complex and Imax theater.

Yes, I think you’ll find this a most suitable stage to begin your discoveries of the treasures of our diverse and beautiful Vancouver.

Brief Historical Interruption:

I would interrupt your lovely view to explain a little of Vancouver’s history. As you can see, Vancouver is a relatively new city; it was built in the 1850s in response to a gold boom when gold was discovered up the Fraser River; and in 1887 took off like a shooting star with the arrival of the first transcontinental railroad.

Entrance to China Town. Copyright 1998 Victoria Brooks.Chinatown:

 

I proudly point out to you that part of Vancouver’s magnetic charm is its cultural diversity; a peaceful melting pot for many cultures, with deep ethnic roots in Asia, Britain and Europe. In fact, Vancouver boasts the second largest Chinatown in North America. Here you will find markets filled with exotic fruits such as the pomello (a tropical version of grapefruit), the hairy red rambutan; and even the infamous Durian -- famed for its flavor, vilified for its disgusting odor. In Asia, hotel rooms often have signs forbidding guests to open the stinky Durian fruit in their rooms.)

Copyright Victoria Brooks 1998.(An aside: Chinatown, with its Asian signs, and Chinese shop house architecture is on the edge of Vancouver’s tenderloin -- the area where the destitute -- addicts, prostitutes and street people go about their daily business. So please don’t wander too far from the Chinatown district and stay off East Hastings St. -- especially at night.)

False Creek -
The Urbane People & The Boat Parade:

Now I would like to take you to where the downtowners live. Across from Granville Island, high rise apartments with glassy stares soar to the clouds and the mountains; some keeping watch over the False Creek Marina. In good weather take a chair on any of the outdoor patios; order a Granville Island Lager; cappuccino, or glass of wine and get ready for the urban parade. If the weather is inclement (which it often is -- take a seat inside a glassed in cafe, hang your MEC (Mountain Equipment Coop) rain slicker on the back of your chair and watch the sea gulls soar by. If you look up, you’ll notice two bridges, the Burrard and Granville. We are sitting practically under the Burrard Street Bridge. Behind us, two young women chatter in Spanish to the strains of two flamenco guitars; their white poodle waiting patiently by their expensively clad feet. The poodle is waiting for its mistress to take out a doggy treat -- bought at Granville Island -- just a mini ferry ride away.

A young man of Chinese origin (probably born in Vancouver) light as a feather on roller blades, skims expertly across the boardwalk, skin glittering like gold in the summer heat. In the harbour, a Dragon Boat, synchronized oars slicing through the silvery water passes Champagne Charlie, the sleek party yacht slipping slowly but exuberantly by. Inside Champagne Charlie, and on the decks we can see tuxedo-clad men, and woman in long gowns chatting, dancing, and toasting the good life in Vancouver, fluted glasses overflowing with B.C. champagne. Back on the boardwalk, west coasters stride past in T shirts and shorts, hiking boots and back packs. On a bench an Asian heterosexual couple sits, dressed urbanely in Versace and Hugo Boss, both murmuring into matching cell phones. All these people have something in common -- the ocean edge and downtown Vancouver.

copyright 1998 Victoria Brooks.Vancouver is riddled with waterways -- this adds to the city's deep beauty, but, for many including myself -- makes it easy to lose your bearings. But Vancouver boasts the most extensive public transit system in Canada. And taking transit makes it harder to get lost. Inexpensive and quick, you'll travel by harbor ferries (Sea Bus) rapid transit (Sky Train) and bus -- and the transit system is wheelchair accessible. Locals and tourists mix and mingle in Vancouver's vibrant downtown core; relaxing in the parks (almost half of the downtown has been set aside as parks); shopping for bargains on trendy Robson Street; browsing the art galleries on Granville; or people watching from a sidewalk café or at a bar in Yaletown. Add that to the fact that Canada is a bargain for traveler's and you'll be on your way to deliciously scenic Vancouver. Yes, I am quite sure, I would even say… When you see it… You'll give it a 10!

Dear readers, here are some unimportant but interesting (I think) tidbits that might enhance the enjoyment of your upcoming trip to Vancouver.

Poetic Trivia

"The Chiefs' daughters can be seen wrapped in the sun, the snows and the stars of all seasons." Famous Canadian First Nations writer E. Pauline Johnson 's beautifully poetic description of the twin peaks ("Chiefs' daughters") that can be viewed from the Canada Place Promenade in downtown Vancouver. Ms. Johnson prose is on the curriculum in many Canadian schools.

Movie Mania

Vancouver has been the scene for numerous movies and television shows including the X-Files and is happily referred to as Brollywood. Get it? Brolly is a British term for umbrella and Vancouver is a very rainy place. Also the Br stands for British Columbia.

Wild Water Stuff

Vancouver's waters are famous for killer whales, harbour porpoises, Dall porpoises and harbour seals. In 1986, a new mammal was sighted for the first time off Vancouver's coastline -- Pacific white-sided dolphins. The theory is that they have been driven from the open ocean by driftnet fishery.

After all that racing around town you'll be famished. Here's where the Vancouverites go…

 

Vijs - 1480 W. 11th Ave. (at Burrard), Vancouver.
Ph: (604) 736-6664
$$$
Dinner in Delhi? You can imagine you are in faraway India with the perfect Indian gentleman host when you dine at Vijs. This tiny ethic eatery is a family operation (his mother is the chef and Vij himself the host). Vij's modern Indian cuisine constantly walks away with 'best Asian food' awards for Vancouver. And with good reason, the food is simply perfect. Vegetarians must try the scrumptious "Rapini" a type of Indian spinach topped with pecans and baked with cheese curd. Pair any of the food with a delightful and refreshing Storm draught (a local Vancouver beer). No reservations but if you have to wait you’ll be served complimentary papadoms and cha (delicious Indian tea).

Century Grill - 1095 Hamilton St., Vancouver.
Ph: (604) 688-8088
$$$$
Yup, you can be a yuppie for the evening. In trendier than trendy Yaletown, Vancouver, this is a simple matter -- just hang at The Century Grill. An outdoor heated patio (weather permitting) or a seat at the bar (there are two -- liquor and oyster) lets you rub shoulders with the decked out clientele of all ages who strut their stuff in and out the door. The bar is shoulder to shoulder with singles looking to be seen, see who’s on the scene, make a deal, or take a chance on romance. All ages of yuppies and wannabe yuppies, from the not yet married to the over 40 married, married and maybe hoping to marry again, hang out here. You may see a look-alike Tom Selleck (but younger than that dashing actor), you will see models, a few Ferraris parked on the street, and maybe an actor in town filming. Besides being a visual delight for Vancouver’s own brand of people watching -- the food is fabulous and there is a killer selection of martinis and a watering hole selection of BC beer on tap. So eat, drink, watch, and pretend to be a yuppie for the evening. Best evening to pretend is Friday. Call ahead to reserve.

Take a look at Guy Goes Gourmet -- for a guy's review of the Century Grill and a fabulous recipe. For a glimpse into how trendy Century Grill is -- check out the movie star look of Executive Chef Sulatycky.

Yuppie Dog's Deserve Treats Too

If you need to take a souvenir home for the pup, stop in at the Red Caboose in front of Kids' Market on Granville Island for home made dog treats with names like the Dog's Breakfast, Woofles and Puppy Pops.

The Cotton Club - 200-1833 Anderson Ave., Vancouver.
Ph: (604) 738 7465
$$$$
The straight-ahead sound of jazz is hidden upstairs at the entrance to Granville Island. This elegant big city style restaurant and bar named after The Cotton Club in Harlem is like Lil’ Red Riding Hood said, "not too big and not too small, but just right" (seats 100 inside and 65 outside). If you’ve already had dinner elsewhere, don’t worry. Grab a seat at the bar and order a drink and some mouth-watering dessert then tune up your ears. If you’re dining and want to get into the music, ask your waiter to crank it up. Diners at other tables won’t have their conversations blown due to a conversation friendly sound system -- the speaker system is channeled into zones. Ever changing trios and quartets play Thursday, Friday and Saturday 8 p.m. to midnight, Sunday noon to 2 p.m. and 8 to 10 p.m. Telephone for reservations.

Pacific Starlight Dinner Train. Copyrighted image - used with permission.Pacific Starlight Dinner Train (604) 984-5500 or 800 363-3733.

If you want to treat yourself to one of Vancouver's very best outings buy a ticket on the Pacific Starlight Dinner Train. This three hour trip on nine lovingly refurbished coaches is an experience to remember and worth every penny of the fare. A favorite of locals, this 1920s jazz age inspired dinner train from North Vancouver chugs along spectacular Howe Sound to Porteau Cove pairing the best of west coast scenery and west coast cuisine. You'll get a bird's eye of mountains, sea, snazzy West Vancouver mansions, estates and gardens, the Lion's Gate Bridge, the cityscape, waterfalls and the North Shore mountains. If that's not enough to keep you happy, you'll be entertained at the station by one of Vancouver's foremost jazz bands. Dance to the strains of the jazz band during the 45 minute stopover at lovely Porteau Cove. Fully licensed. Hours: May 1 to October 31; Christmas and New Years. Leaves North Van. at 6:15 p.m. arriving back in North Vancouver at 9:45 p.m. Admission: CDN$69 per person including a three course gourmet dinner. For a gourmet trip on the train and a recipe, train style go to Guy Goes Gourmet.

B.C. Rail also offers the Royal Hudson, a steam powered train from North Vancouver to Squamish and of course, a train trip through the Rocky Mountains with optional hotel accommodations. Ph: (604) 984-5500 or 800 363-3733

Vancouverites escape their kitchens -- sometimes, all we need to change our short term perspective is an evening out. To research and choose the best bets for dinner in Vancouver purchase a Zagats 1998 Vancouver Restaurant guide. The $12.95 spent is well worth it. At your favorite bookstore. Also check out my own food critic that galloping gadabout, Guy Goes Gourmet for a free and ever building selection of restaurants and recipes from famous restaurants in Vancouver -- and wherever we travel.

I really hope you can take the time and visit my beautiful Vancouver.

With all appropriate affection,
Victoria Brooks.

For further information: phone Vancouver Tourism at (604) 683 2000 or call toll free to Tourism British Columbia at 1 800 663 6000. Or go to their web site at www.tourism-vancouver.org

Books:

To research your trip, especially if you are traveling around the spectacular province of British Columbia -- your best all-around guide book is (as usual) the Moon British Columbia HandBook (including Vancouver, Victoria and the Canadian Rockies), thoroughly researched and creatively written by Jane King & Andrew Hempstead. Maps are good, and the accommodations and tours will suit all -- from budget to family and deluxe. Go to the Bookstore.

If you are coming to Vancouver and environ's for a kissingly good time, Romantic Days & Nights In Vancouver will literally show you the romantic road. These well researched and well thought out lovers' itineraries (written by Vancouver duet, Barbara Braidwood & Richard Cropp) will help you dine, dance, stroll, sleep, shop, snuggle and even hike your way through one of the most romantic cities on the West Coast. They will even tell you the best places to get on your knees and pop the lifetime question. Written for all types of lovers (even culture lovers and sports lovers) this guide is for all those romantic souls who still melt at the sight of the stars, a full moon and each other.

For Lover's Only: Romantic Days and Nights in Vancouver, by Barbara Braidwood & Richard Cropp (Globe Pequot Press US$15.95) You can order the book from the publisher at www.globe-pequot.com



For more BC information go to travel.bc.ca
Entrance to China Town. Copyright 1998 Victoria Brooks.Chinatown:

I proudly point out to you that part of Vancouver’s magnetic charm is its cultural diversity; a peaceful melting pot for many cultures, with deep ethnic roots in Asia, Britain and Europe. In fact, Vancouver boasts the second largest Chinatown in North America. Here you will find markets filled with exotic fruits such as the pomello (a tropical version of grapefruit), the hairy red rambutan; and even the infamous Durian -- famed for its flavor, vilified for its disgusting odor. In Asia, hotel rooms often have signs forbidding guests to open the stinky Durian fruit in their rooms.)

Copyright Victoria Brooks 1998.(An aside: Chinatown, with its Asian signs, and Chinese shop house architecture is on the edge of Vancouver’s tenderloin -- the area where the destitute -- addicts, prostitutes and street people go about their daily business. So please don’t wander too far from the Chinatown district and stay off East Hastings St. -- especially at night.)

False Creek -
The Urbane People & The Boat Parade:

Now I would like to take you to where the downtowners live. Across from Granville Island, high rise apartments with glassy stares soar to the clouds and the mountains; some keeping watch over the False Creek Marina. In good weather take a chair on any of the outdoor patios; order a Granville Island Lager; cappuccino, or glass of wine and get ready for the urban parade. If the weather is inclement (which it often is -- take a seat inside a glassed in cafe, hang your MEC (Mountain Equipment Coop) rain slicker on the back of your chair and watch the sea gulls soar by. If you look up, you’ll notice two bridges, the Burrard and Granville. We are sitting practically under the Burrard Street Bridge. Behind us, two young women chatter in Spanish to the strains of two flamenco guitars; their white poodle waiting patiently by their expensively clad feet. The poodle is waiting for its mistress to take out a doggy treat -- bought at Granville Island -- just a mini ferry ride away.

A young man of Chinese origin (probably born in Vancouver) light as a feather on roller blades, skims expertly across the boardwalk, skin glittering like gold in the summer heat. In the harbour, a Dragon Boat, synchronized oars slicing through the silvery water passes Champagne Charlie, the sleek party yacht slipping slowly but exuberantly by. Inside Champagne Charlie, and on the decks we can see tuxedo-clad men, and woman in long gowns chatting, dancing, and toasting the good life in Vancouver, fluted glasses overflowing with B.C. champagne. Back on the boardwalk, west coasters stride past in T shirts and shorts, hiking boots and back packs. On a bench an Asian heterosexual couple sits, dressed urbanely in Versace and Hugo Boss, both murmuring into matching cell phones. All these people have something in common -- the ocean edge and downtown Vancouver.

copyright 1998 Victoria Brooks.Vancouver is riddled with waterways -- this adds to the city's deep beauty, but, for many including myself -- makes it easy to lose your bearings. But Vancouver boasts the most extensive public transit system in Canada. And taking transit makes it harder to get lost. Inexpensive and quick, you'll travel by harbor ferries (Sea Bus) rapid transit (Sky Train) and bus -- and the transit system is wheelchair accessible. Locals and tourists mix and mingle in Vancouver's vibrant downtown core; relaxing in the parks (almost half of the downtown has been set aside as parks); shopping for bargains on trendy Robson Street; browsing the art galleries on Granville; or people watching from a sidewalk café or at a bar in Yaletown. Add that to the fact that Canada is a bargain for traveler's and you'll be on your way to deliciously scenic Vancouver. Yes, I am quite sure, I would even say… When you see it… You'll give it a 10!

Dear readers, here are some unimportant but interesting (I think) tidbits that might enhance the enjoyment of your upcoming trip to Vancouver.

Poetic Trivia

"The Chiefs' daughters can be seen wrapped in the sun, the snows and the stars of all seasons." Famous Canadian First Nations writer E. Pauline Johnson 's beautifully poetic description of the twin peaks ("Chiefs' daughters") that can be viewed from the Canada Place Promenade in downtown Vancouver. Ms. Johnson prose is on the curriculum in many Canadian schools.

Movie Mania

Vancouver has been the scene for numerous movies and television shows including the X-Files and is happily referred to as Brollywood. Get it? Brolly is a British term for umbrella and Vancouver is a very rainy place. Also the Br stands for British Columbia.

Wild Water Stuff

Vancouver's waters are famous for killer whales, harbour porpoises, Dall porpoises and harbour seals. In 1986, a new mammal was sighted for the first time off Vancouver's coastline -- Pacific white-sided dolphins. The theory is that they have been driven from the open ocean by driftnet fishery.

After all that racing around town you'll be famished. Here's where the Vancouverites go…

Vijs - 1480 W. 11th Ave. (at Burrard), Vancouver.
Ph: (604) 736-6664
$$$
Dinner in Delhi? You can imagine you are in faraway India with the perfect Indian gentleman host when you dine at Vijs. This tiny ethic eatery is a family operation (his mother is the chef and Vij himself the host). Vij's modern Indian cuisine constantly walks away with 'best Asian food' awards for Vancouver. And with good reason, the food is simply perfect. Vegetarians must try the scrumptious "Rapini" a type of Indian spinach topped with pecans and baked with cheese curd. Pair any of the food with a delightful and refreshing Storm draught (a local Vancouver beer). No reservations but if you have to wait you’ll be served complimentary papadoms and cha (delicious Indian tea).

Century Grill - 1095 Hamilton St., Vancouver.
Ph: (604) 688-8088
$$$$
Yup, you can be a yuppie for the evening. In trendier than trendy Yaletown, Vancouver, this is a simple matter -- just hang at The Century Grill. An outdoor heated patio (weather permitting) or a seat at the bar (there are two -- liquor and oyster) lets you rub shoulders with the decked out clientele of all ages who strut their stuff in and out the door. The bar is shoulder to shoulder with singles looking to be seen, see who’s on the scene, make a deal, or take a chance on romance. All ages of yuppies and wannabe yuppies, from the not yet married to the over 40 married, married and maybe hoping to marry again, hang out here. You may see a look-alike Tom Selleck (but younger than that dashing actor), you will see models, a few Ferraris parked on the street, and maybe an actor in town filming. Besides being a visual delight for Vancouver’s own brand of people watching -- the food is fabulous and there is a killer selection of martinis and a watering hole selection of BC beer on tap. So eat, drink, watch, and pretend to be a yuppie for the evening. Best evening to pretend is Friday. Call ahead to reserve.

Take a look at Guy Goes Gourmet -- for a guy's review of the Century Grill and a fabulous recipe. For a glimpse into how trendy Century Grill is -- check out the movie star look of Executive Chef Sulatycky.

Yuppie Dog's Deserve Treats Too

If you need to take a souvenir home for the pup, stop in at the Red Caboose in front of Kids' Market on Granville Island for home made dog treats with names like the Dog's Breakfast, Woofles and Puppy Pops.

The Cotton Club - 200-1833 Anderson Ave., Vancouver.
Ph: (604) 738 7465
$$$$
The straight-ahead sound of jazz is hidden upstairs at the entrance to Granville Island. This elegant big city style restaurant and bar named after The Cotton Club in Harlem is like Lil’ Red Riding Hood said, "not too big and not too small, but just right" (seats 100 inside and 65 outside). If you’ve already had dinner elsewhere, don’t worry. Grab a seat at the bar and order a drink and some mouth-watering dessert then tune up your ears. If you’re dining and want to get into the music, ask your waiter to crank it up. Diners at other tables won’t have their conversations blown due to a conversation friendly sound system -- the speaker system is channeled into zones. Ever changing trios and quartets play Thursday, Friday and Saturday 8 p.m. to midnight, Sunday noon to 2 p.m. and 8 to 10 p.m. Telephone for reservations.

Pacific Starlight Dinner Train. Copyrighted image - used with permission.Pacific Starlight Dinner Train (604) 984-5500 or 800 363-3733.

If you want to treat yourself to one of Vancouver's very best outings buy a ticket on the Pacific Starlight Dinner Train. This three hour trip on nine lovingly refurbished coaches is an experience to remember and worth every penny of the fare. A favorite of locals, this 1920s jazz age inspired dinner train from North Vancouver chugs along spectacular Howe Sound to Porteau Cove pairing the best of west coast scenery and west coast cuisine. You'll get a bird's eye of mountains, sea, snazzy West Vancouver mansions, estates and gardens, the Lion's Gate Bridge, the cityscape, waterfalls and the North Shore mountains. If that's not enough to keep you happy, you'll be entertained at the station by one of Vancouver's foremost jazz bands. Dance to the strains of the jazz band during the 45 minute stopover at lovely Porteau Cove. Fully licensed. Hours: May 1 to October 31; Christmas and New Years. Leaves North Van. at 6:15 p.m. arriving back in North Vancouver at 9:45 p.m. Admission: CDN$69 per person including a three course gourmet dinner. For a gourmet trip on the train and a recipe, train style go to Guy Goes Gourmet.

B.C. Rail also offers the Royal Hudson, a steam powered train from North Vancouver to Squamish and of course, a train trip through the Rocky Mountains with optional hotel accommodations. Ph: (604) 984-5500 or 800 363-3733

Vancouverites escape their kitchens -- sometimes, all we need to change our short term perspective is an evening out. To research and choose the best bets for dinner in Vancouver purchase a Zagats 1998 Vancouver Restaurant guide. The $12.95 spent is well worth it. At your favorite bookstore. Also check out my own food critic that galloping gadabout, Guy Goes Gourmet for a free and ever building selection of restaurants and recipes from famous restaurants in Vancouver -- and wherever we travel.

I really hope you can take the time and visit my beautiful Vancouver.

With all appropriate affection,
Victoria Brooks.

For further information: phone Vancouver Tourism at (604) 683 2000 or call toll free to Tourism British Columbia at 1 800 663 6000. Or go to their web site at www.tourism-vancouver.org

Books:

To research your trip, especially if you are traveling around the spectacular province of British Columbia -- your best all-around guide book is (as usual) the Moon British Columbia HandBook (including Vancouver, Victoria and the Canadian Rockies), thoroughly researched and creatively written by Jane King & Andrew Hempstead. Maps are good, and the accommodations and tours will suit all -- from budget to family and deluxe. Go to the Bookstore.

If you are coming to Vancouver and environ's for a kissingly good time, Romantic Days & Nights In Vancouver will literally show you the romantic road. These well researched and well thought out lovers' itineraries (written by Vancouver duet, Barbara Braidwood & Richard Cropp) will help you dine, dance, stroll, sleep, shop, snuggle and even hike your way through one of the most romantic cities on the West Coast. They will even tell you the best places to get on your knees and pop the lifetime question. Written for all types of lovers (even culture lovers and sports lovers) this guide is for all those romantic souls who still melt at the sight of the stars, a full moon and each other.

For Lover's Only: Romantic Days and Nights in Vancouver, by Barbara Braidwood & Richard Cropp (Globe Pequot Press US$15.95) You can order the book from the publisher at www.globe-pequot.com



For more BC information go to travel.bc.ca